Part 1 of 2: Report on #DepoST (Deposit Tool Show & Tell) Meeting 2009-12-10

NOTE TO READER: JISC IS CURRENTLY IN THE PROCESS OF DRAFTING A CALL FOR PROPOSALS TO FURTHER EMBED DEPOSIT TOOLS AND SOLUTIONS INTO THE AUTHORS DAY-TO-DAY WORKBENCH. PLEASE SUBSCRIBE TO ONE OF JISC’S MANY FUNDING ANNOUNCEMENT FEEDS FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ON THIS CALL.

PLEASE SEE PART 2 OF 2 ON THE EVALUATION (FEATURES AND FLOWS) OF THE ‘DEPOST TOOL MEETING’

Published by: David F. Flanders (JISC Programme Manager)

Just before I sat down to write this post, I quickly went back to have a look at the originalSWORD (Deposit API) Project to look up when the first draft specification was published, to my amazement version 1 was published *exactly* two years to the date of the “Deposit Tool Show & Tell” event: 12 October 2007. And quite significantly (as you’ll see below), there are well over twenty different applications and deposit tools built atop the SWORD Deposit API since that first 1.0 publication. So, CONGRATULATIONS ON YOUR TWO YEAR ANNIVERSARY SWORD! A little tip of the hat to Rachael Heery who brought a bunch of us hackers to sit around a table to talk about how deposit could be improved, your focus and drive in this space is missed.

The show (and tell) -must of course- go on, accordingly here is agenda for the day along with the people who attended. The rest of the story is picked up by our blogger-on-the-day Bashera Kahn:

12 October 2009, London, UK. JISC held a one-day Barcamp at the University of London focusing on author deposit tools, ahead of the DSpace User Group Meeting at the University of Gothenburg in Sweden.

The Deposit Show & Tell event is one of the first steps in JISC’s plan to invest £300,000 in sustained improvements to author deposit tools. It followed the September 2009 JISC report into how and why UK researchers publish and disseminate their findings, which provides an excellent contextual backdrop to the challenges facing the architects and users of repositories and deposit tools.

‘DepoST’, as it was tagged, brought together developers and stakeholders from across the UK and Europe who have already broken ground on creating and refining author deposit tools and interfaces.

Several lightning-fast rounds of demonstrations proved that the development space in this area is thriving, with a strong focus on making the deposit process quicker and easier for users authoring research content, from academics to students, librarians to archivists and curators.

JISC’s David F. Flanders stressed in his welcoming address the importance of adding improved ‘feedback loops’ to the deposit process, to provide authors with more information during and after the process than just ‘Okay’.

Flanders mentioned a few patterns he’d observed in the showcased tools which adopted workflows and interactions that would be familiar to users from commonplace computing or online experiences, such as:

David’s Slides on: The ‘Deposit Tool Show And Tell’ Event (Introduction to the Day and Overview of Deposit Tool Types for Author Publishing)

<–!DFF: The twenty some, short and fast (“lightning talk”) ‘show and tell’ presentations followed with five minutes a piece to SHOW their app, with five minutes ‘question and TELL’ following:

Shown & Told:

(1) Julian Cheal, SUE/SIS Systems Developer, UKOLN

(2) Dave Tarrant, Postgraduate researcher, University of Southampton

(3) Pat McSweeney, ePrints project developer, University of Southampton

(4) Peter Sefton, eScholarship Tech Team Manager, University of Southern Queensland, Australia

(5) Richard Jones, Symplectic Limited

(6) Alex Strelnikov, UKOLN

(7) Jan Reichelt, Mendeley

(8) Ian Stuart, Software Engineer, EDINA

(9) Joe Lambert, University of Southampton

(10) Viv Cothey, Gloucestershire Archives

(11) Tim Brody, EPrints WebDav, University of Southampton

(12) Theo Andrew & Fred Howell, The Open Access Repository, EDINA

(13) Stuart Lewis, IT Innovations Analyst & Developer, University of Auckland Library

(14) Alex Wade, Director for Scholarly Communication, Microsoft External Research

(15) Seb Francois, University of Southampton

(16) Julian Tenney and Patrick Lockey, Xerte, University of Nottingham

(17) James Ballard & Richard Davis, University of London

(18) Dan Needham, University of Manchester & Alan Danskin, British Library

The second half of the day focused in on the FEATURES that each of the above tool provided to the end-user along with the various work(FLOWS) that depositing research content could take:

PLEASE SEE PART 2 OF 2 ON THE EVALUATION (FEATURES AND FLOWS) OF THE ‘DEPOST TOOL MEETING’

Comments

3 Responses to “Part 1 of 2: Report on #DepoST (Deposit Tool Show & Tell) Meeting 2009-12-10”

  1. John’s JISC CETIS blog » DepoST : what would a repository deposit tool look like for learning materials? on November 6th, 2009 1:03 pm
  2. Briefing Paper (II) « jiscEXPO on March 9th, 2010 9:15 pm

    [...] easier deposit have been highlighted by the success of open Web APIs (such as SWORD/APP) and the deposit tools that have been created on top of them. [...]

  3. DepoST revisited « Repository News on June 18th, 2010 3:18 pm

    [...] June 18, 2010 — Nick The DepoST – Deposit Show and Tell Meeting – was held last October at the University of London Student Union. The aim of the event was “to [...]

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